Ray Rogers Handcrafted Knives




The Forge Body






Any metal tank of any thickness will do as long as it isn't galvanized. Even a metal form that is so flimsy it wobbles will do the job. I started with this old well head.


Remove the unnecessary parts...


Cut the required openeing...




I added these extra parts to hold dies but they aren't required.


These are my nozzle guides. They are just pieces of pipe that your nozzles will fit into. They insure the nozzle will point where you want it to point and stay there. There is a nut welded to each one. A bolt can be screwed into the nut which locks the nozzle in place.

You do not need two nozzles on most forges, one is enough. If you are building your first forge, mount the nozzle on the side above the centerline and about in the middle of the forge rather than at the rear as these are.


Looking into the front of the forge with the nozzles inserted into the nozzle guides you can see the nozzle arrangement that I wanted to test.




Now that all the welding on the body is complete you can start building the interior. In this case, I chose to use castable refractory to form the bottom of this forge. If this is your first forge, skip the castable and just use the wool. Put a couple of firebricks on top of the wool to form the bottom of your forge.




Here is the wool installed over the castable. The picture shows two layers of 1" wool but I eventually went to three layers to reduce the large volume of this forge body (a smaller interior is easier to heat to high temperatures). If you do not use the castable then the wool simply goes all the way around. A single layer of 1" wool is enough for a small forge. Once the wool is in place, paint a thin layer of Satanite or some similar product over it. This will stiffen the wool and prevent the loose fibers from being blown out into the air when the forge is running. Breathing these loose fibers into your lungs is very bad for your health so do not skip this step!





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Ray Rogers Handcrafted Knives